IMMEDIATE EMERGENCY ACTIONS

If you suspect a problem and encounter sign of a pipeline release, or any other unusual sights, sounds, or smells near a pipeline location or facility, follow these steps:

  • If you can do so safely, shut off or remove any ignition sources near the pipeline or facility;
  • Leave the area immediately and avoid contact with liquids or gases;
  • Call 911, then call Kingston Midstream’s 24-hour Emergency Number at
    • Saskatchewan – 1-888-420-4357
    • Manitoba – 1-844-333-6789
  • Warn others to stay away and follow instructions from Kingston Midstream representatives and local responders.

Once received, Kingston Midstream responders will be dispatched to the location to investigate the incident. Public safety measures may be implemented such as sheltering-in-place if deemed necessary. In the event of an emergency, Kingston Midstream’s emergency response plan will immediately be initiated, and we will work with local emergency responders to resolve the issue. 

Click here to view our Emergency Responder Information Brochure

 

IF YOU DO NOT KNOW THE LOCATION OF THE PIPELINE LEAK, SHELTER-IN-PLACE

Sheltering in place is the practice of having the public stay in their homes or other buildings under controlled conditions during an emergency. Sheltering is an effective way for persons to buffer themselves from outside elements that could include toxic and/or flammable gases. It is an effective means of protecting the public when:

  • There is insufficient time or warning to safely evacuate;
  • Residents are waiting for evacuation assistance;
  • The release will be of limited size and/or duration;
  • The location of a release has not been identified;
  • The public would be at higher risk if evacuated;
  • Escape routes traverse the hazards.

HOW TO SHELTER-IN-PLACE

  • Do not leave the residence. Remaining sheltered indoors will protect you from a possible explosion and / or reduce the possibility of coming into contact with the gas plume;
  • Gather everyone inside their residence, close all outside windows and doors and move to the highest floor in the house. If possible, go to an inside room and stay away from outside windows and doors, and other places where gases may leak in;
  • Shut off exhaust fans, clothes dryers, furnaces, ventilation systems, and extinguish all potential sources of ignition including all gas pilot lights (e.g. furnace and hot water heater) and fires (e.g. fireplace). DO NOT SMOKE or have an open flame;
  • Tape openings around loose-fitting doors and windows;
  • Do not to use the telephone except for emergencies;
  • When the “all-clear” has been declared, open all windows, start ventilation systems, and leave the building for at least 20 minutes. This will ventilate any contaminated air in the building.

SIGNS OF A PIPELINE RELEASE

The liquid hydrocarbons in Kingston Midstream’s pipeline system are flammable and are potentially hazardous and explosive under certain conditions. It is important that you know the warning signs and how to respond in the event of an emergency.

 

KNOW THE WARNING SIGNS FOR AN OIL RELEASE

The odour of an oil release may differ depending on the exact composition, however, you may smell an unusual petroleum odour similar to gasoline or diesel fuel or “rotten egg” odour. Other warning signs include:

  • A moist patch or pool of black liquid;
  • Discoloured vegetation on or near the pipeline;
  • Black liquid spraying from a pipeline;
  • Oily sheen or rainbow colours on water surfaces;
  • Melted snow or ice over pipeline areas;
  • Hissing or roaring sound coming from around the pipeline area.

 

KNOW THE WARNING SIGNS FOR A NATURAL GAS LIQUIDS (NGL) RELEASE

Natural gas liquid has an odour similar to gasoline, but much stronger and extremely unpleasant. If you do not smell an odour, other signs of a natural gas liquids release include:

  • A cloud of steam or mist caused by condensation and freezing moisture;
  • Ice build up on exposed pipe and frozen ground around an underground pipe;
  • Yellow-stained or discoloured snow around pipeline area;
  • Hissing or roaring sound coming from around pipeline;
  • Blowing dirt from the ground